Eagles of Death Metal: Non Amis (Our Friends)

eagles of death metal non amisDirected by Colin Hanks, this documentary offers an inside, heartbreaking look into the tragic terrorist attack in Paris at the Bataclan concert hall during a show by the Eagles of Death Metal a little over a year ago. 89 people were killed in the theater, 368 were inujred, 130 total died in what was an act of murder and hate. This film is about not only what happened that night but how the band returned to Paris to perform for the survivors after this horrific incident.

The doc starts with some backstory in terms of how the band formed as a bond between two close friends who both used music as both catharsis and a form of expression. Those friends being Jesse Hughes (guitar and lead vocals) along with Josh Homme who is on drums. If you’re not familiar with Josh, he’s the rock star of the two as some of his credits include Kyuss and most notably Queens of the Stone Age. Both have been best buds since fending off bullies in high school and remain tight to this day. Their friendship is part of the spine of the story and is one of the elements that keeps you glued to the screen as everything plays out.

Interviews with the band, their crew and their friends along with people who attended the concert fill in all the brutal details. It’s compelling to listen to while scary and very sad all at once. To hear it in such a specific way from each person’s standpoint, it’s like they all had their own version of the same horror movie that none of them could escape.

There are uplifting moments here too, and thank God for it. After listening to what happened, I found myself angry and desperately wanting something good to be in here somewhere. Luckily, the end of the film ties up with the band returning to Paris after help and encouragement from their fans and from U2 who stepped up to show their support in the face of malice and intimidation. The calls to action from the people who rallied both in the band and around them are a big inspiration and should be both celebrated and shared as a sign of hope for others.

As hard as this film is to watch, I’m sure I’m going to watch it again, and again.

reviewed by Sean McKnight