The Impossible

The Impossible is based on the true story of an unfortunate/extremely fortunate family that was on vacation in Thailand when it was hit by a tsunami in 2004. I say unfortunate/extremely fortunate because they had to go through such a terrible experience but that they all survived it. There were numerous families that didn’t survive or that lost members from this tragic event… The film is told in a very compelling way with the opening of the film revealing the family on vacation at a beach front resort for Christmas. There’s some minor backstory revealed here and there to establish

August: Osage County

Well, this one’s a bit of a downer, it’s very well done, but damn, it’s a downer… Based on the play by Tracy Letts (who also wrote the screenplay), August: Osage County features the story of a family broken, very broken, mostly by their own devices and attitudes. Plagued by dreary, depressing attitudes, drug abuse, cancer, suicide, incest and a lot of denial, the whole story feels doomed and at times is hard to watch as there’s very little joy found anywhere in here. Even during the few moments of positivity in the film they become quickly overshadowed by the

Haywire

Directed by Steven Soderbergh, Haywire is the story of a former black ops soldier (Gina Carano as Mallory Kane) who is now working in the private sector as a work-for-hire mercenary. Double-crossed, Kane is set up to be eliminated by her employers as part of a more elaborate scheme being built in the background. It’s a revenge story, one we’ve seen many times over. So, Haywire doesn’t do well on the originality scale but it is still fun to watch. One reason why it’s fun is due to Soderbergh’s slick style in terms of storytelling. His use of music, pacing,